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Memorias de investigación
Research Publications in journals:
Effect of type of fiber, site of fermentation, and method of analysis on digestibility of soluble and insoluble fiber in rabbits
Year:2015
Research Areas
  • Animal production
Information
Abstract
The effect of type of fiber, site of fermetation, method for quantifying insoluble and soluble dietary fiber, and their correction for intestinal mucin on fiber digestibility were examined in rabbits. Three diets differing in soluble fiber were formulated (8.5% soluble fiber, on DM basis, in the low soluble fiber [LSF] diet; 10.2% in the medium soluble fiber [MSF] diet; and 14.5% in the high soluble fiber [HSF] diet). They were obtained by replacing half of the dehydrated alfalfa in the MSF diet with a mixture of beet and apple pulp (HSF diet) or with a mix of oat hulls and soybean protein (LSF diet). Thirty rabbits with ileal T-cannulas were used to determine ileal and fecal digestibility. Cecal digestibility was determined by difference between fecal and ileal digestibility. Insoluble fiber was measured as NDF, insoluble dietary fiber (IDF), and in vitro insoluble fiber, whereas soluble fiber was calculated as the difference between total dietary fiber (TDF) and NDF (TDF_NDF), IDF (TDF-IDF), and in vitro insoluble fiber (TDF-in vitro insoluble fiber). The intestinal mucin content was used to correct the TDF and soluble fiber digestibility. Ileal and fecal concentration of mucin increased from the LSF to the HSF diet group (P < 0.01). Once corrected for intestinal mucin, ileal and fecal digestibility of TDF and soluble fiber increased whereas cecal digestibility decreased (P < 0.01). Ileal digestibility of TDF increased from the LSF to the HSF diet group (12.0 vs. 28.1%; P < 0.01), with no difference in the cecum (26.4%), resulting in a higher fecal digestibility from the LSF to the HSF diet group (P < 0.01). Ileal digestibility of insoluble fiber increased from the LSF to the HSF diet group (11.3 vs. 21.0%; P < 0.01), with no difference in the cecum (13.9%) and no effect of fiber method, resulting in a higher fecal digestibility for rabbits fed the HSF diet compared with the MSF and LSF diets groups (P < 0.01).Fecal digestibility of NDF was higher compared with IDF or in vitro insoluble fiber (P < 0.01). Ileal soluble fiber digestibility was higher for the HSF than for the LSF diet group (43.6 vs. 14.5%; P < 0.01) and fiber method did not affect it. Cecal soluble fiber digestibility decreased from the LSF to the HSF diet group (72.1 vs. 49.2%; P < 0.05). The lowest cecal and fecal soluble fiber digestibility was measured using TDF-NDF (P < 0.01). In conclusion, a correction for intestinal mucin is necessary for ileal TDF and soluble fiber digestibility whereas the selection of the fiber method has a minor relevance. The inclusion of sugar beet and apple pulp increased the amount of TDF fermented in the small intestine.
International
Si
JCR
Si
Title
Journal of Animal Science
ISBN
0021-8812
Impact factor JCR
1,92
Impact info
Datos JCR del año 2013
Volume
in press
10.2527/jas2014-8767
Journal number
From page
in press
To page
in press
Month
MAYO
Ranking
Participants
  • Autor: Rodrigo Abad Guaman (UPM)
  • Autor: Rosa Maria Carabaño Luengo (UPM)
  • Autor: Maria Soledad Goméz Conde
  • Autor: Javier Garcia Alonso (UPM)
Research Group, Departaments and Institutes related
  • Creador: Grupo de Investigación: Producción Animal
  • Departamento: Producción Agraria
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