Observatorio de I+D+i UPM

Memorias de investigación
Communications at congresses:
Hippocampus, functinal networks and human memory
Year:2015
Research Areas
  • Natural sciences and health sciences
Information
Abstract
Although cognitive function is typically assessed via actions, little is known about how actions influence cognition. Physical movements are hypothesized to enhance memory1. We therefore tested whether ?Go? button-press responses modulate memory encoding by crossing incidental memory encoding with a Go-NoGo task. In a series of experiments (Exps), healthy subjects were shown 190 b&w objects presented with a blue or yellow frame indicating requirement of a Go button press or NoGo response (with equal number of Go and NoGo trials to avoid "oddball" effects on memory encoding). A recognition test was conducted 1hr later. All encoded images (without frame) were presented plus 190 new images, with subjects indicating whether they remembered (R), were familiar with (K) or did not remember (forgotten, F) the image from the encoding phase. In Exp 1, image presentation time was 1s in both phases, with variable ISI. Exp 2 was identical except that subjects were financially rewarded for responding as fast as they could, and financially penalised for commission errors. Exp 3 was identical to Exp 1 except that stimuli were presented for 250ms. Exp 4 was a replication of Exp 3 in the context of functional MRI scanning. Following pre-processing, using SPM8, memory encoding-related activity was analysed in a GLM comprising regressors modeling encoding responses for subsequent R, K and F trials separately for Go and NoGo. Ensuing contrast images for main effects of Go vs NoGo and R vs F, and the interaction were entered into one-sample t-tests across all subjects. Our behavioral studies consistently reveal better remember accuracy for stimuli paired with Go responses. An interaction between motor response and subsequent memory is observed in an area of dorsal pons consistent with the locus coeruleus (LC). Electrophysiological recordings in non-human primates show phasic LC activity during motor acts2 . Given that LC activity leads to the release of noradrenaline throughout the brain, and that noradrenaline enhances memory3, we suggest that motor modulation of memory is mediated by the noradrenergic system.
International
Si
Congress
SOCIETY FOR NEUROSCIENCE 2015
970
Place
CHICAGO, USA
Reviewers
Si
ISBN/ISSN
CDP08UPM
Start Date
17/10/2015
End Date
21/10/2015
From page
0
To page
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ABSTRACTS OF THE SOCIETY FOR NEUROSCIENCE 2015
Participants
  • Autor: Bryan Strange (UPM)
  • Autor: Javier Jesus Gonzalez Rosa (UPM)
  • Autor: Maria del Mar Yebra . (UPM)
  • Autor: A GALARZA
  • Autor: V SOTO LEÓN
  • Autor: A OLIVIERO
  • Autor: M.C.W. KROES
Research Group, Departaments and Institutes related
  • Creador: Grupo de Investigación: Tecnologías para Ciencias de la Salud
  • Centro o Instituto I+D+i: Centro de tecnología Biomédica CTB
  • Departamento: Tecnología Fotónica y Bioingeniería
S2i 2019 Observatorio de investigación @ UPM con la colaboración del Consejo Social UPM
Cofinanciación del MINECO en el marco del Programa INNCIDE 2011 (OTR-2011-0236)
Cofinanciación del MINECO en el marco del Programa INNPACTO (IPT-020000-2010-22)