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Memorias de investigación
Communications at congresses:
DETECTING HIGH-ALTITUDE ICE CRYSTAL (HAIC) ICING EVENTS FROM TOTAL AIR TEMPERATURE (TAT) ANOMALIES
Year:2018
Research Areas
  • Mechanical aeronautics and naval engineering
Information
Abstract
High-Altitude Ice Crystals (HAIC) constitute a hazard to commercial aircraft flying near deep convective weather due to jet-engine power loss and air data probes malfunction. HAIC can stick to warm metal surfaces in jet-engines and cause engine surge, stall, flameout and rollback, power loss, as well as engine compressor damage due to ice shedding. Along with these events, disruption to aircraft systems are noted when HAIC are ingested into air data probes (Pitot tube and/or Total Air Temperature -TATsensor), causing erroneous measurements of temperature and air speed. Particularly, the TAT probe incorrectly reporting zero degrees Celsius or in error is known to be evidence of ice crystals in the atmosphere surrounding the aircraft. TAT anomalies are due to the accumulation of ice crystals in the TAT sensor, producing a zero degrees Celsius reading, generating failures in airspeed indicators and acting as potential incident/accident precursors.
International
Si
Congress
31st Congress of the International Council of the Aeronautical Sciences
960
Place
Belo Horizonte, Brazil
Reviewers
Si
ISBN/ISSN
978-3-932182-88-4
Start Date
09/09/2018
End Date
14/09/2018
From page
1
To page
1
PROCEEDINGS of the 31st Congress of the International Council of the Aeronautical Sciences
Participants
  • Autor: Victor Fernando Gomez Comendador (UPM)
Research Group, Departaments and Institutes related
  • Creador: Grupo de Investigación: Navegación Aérea
  • Departamento: Sistemas Aeroespaciales, Transporte Aéreo y Aeropuertos
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